It seems like everyone is talking about Supply Chain these days, especially with Christmas quickly approaching. Apparently, even the President is concerned he might get coal in his stocking because in recent speeches, President Biden emphasized that if change didn’t occur soon, and the needed parties in the supply chain didn’t become cooperative , he was “going to call them out and ask them to act.” He even went to far as to say, “If federal support is needed, I will direct all appropriate action.” (https://www.freightwaves.com/news/what-can-government-do-to-aid-247-supply-chains?j=68787&sfmc_sub=63554532&l=349_HTML&u=1396662&mid=514011755&jb=18010&utm_source=sfmc&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=FW_Daily_10_18_21&utm_term=Read+More%26nbsp%3b&utm_id=68787&sfmc_id=63554532)

All appropriate action? While most of us might wonder exactly what the government can really do to solve the bottleneck issues at the ports, reality is there is another critical issue that needs solved in the supply chain—a shortage of truckers and trucks to get goods where they need to be. Solving bottleneck issues at the ports are only a band-aid for the supply chain crisis, but it won’t create the flow needed to keep freight moving around the country. There is a critical workforce shortage for truck drivers, and it’s not a simple problem to fix. Job requirements for trucking require months of professional training and few people are excited about taking on the responsibility of driving a big rig.

According to supply-chain expert Tony Nuzio, the trucking industry is in desperate need of young blood. It needs to hire young drivers who are willing to make personal sacrifices and be away from home and family for a week or ten days. The way to attract these young people is technology. Nuzio explains, “It gives them a way to progress on a different career path that are potentially transferrable from trucking to other supply-chain and logistics specialties.”  

One bright spot coming out of the current supply chain crisis is that it is elevating the logistics and supply chain industry as a whole. ASCM’s Kent says, “This is going to bring more attention to the innovations and education necessary to ensure scalable growth at the business level.” His organization estimates that there will be a need for nearly six million logistics and supply chain workers on some level in the next five years.

The question still remains, what does this mean for Christmas this year? For those who hope the supply chain problems will be solved before Santa makes his big debut this year, there might be some disappointment. Word is that we might need to get a bit more creative when it comes to our holiday wish lists; however, the news isn’t all bad. While ports might be bottlenecked, slowing down shipments from overseas, and the country is experiencing a shortage of trucks and drivers, rest assured that Soren is doing everything it can to keep things moving forward. We work nonstop to take care of our customers, our carriers, and everything in between, so that everyone gets what they want for Christmas—this year, and every year! (https://www.forbes.com/sites/pamdanziger/2021/10/15/unclogging-the-ports-will-not-fix–the-supply-chains-even-bigger-trucking-crisis/?sh=e96226f124f3)